Australian Aquatic Biological

Australian aquatic biodiversity research and consultancy

About Robert McCormack

Robert McCormack is the Research and Aquaculture Director for Australian Aquatic Biological P/L. He is a Research Associate with the Carnegie Museum in Pittsburgh, USA, is Secretary of the NSW Aquaculture Association Inc. and the team leader of the privately funded Australian Crayfish Project, which conducts biological studies of every creek and stream in Australia, collecting and identifying crustaceans. Robert has a passion for freshwater crayfish traveling across Australia to find and photograph them.

Euastacus vesper – a NEW Euastacus for NSW

Research Project 100007 initiated in 2008 has finally been completed. This project has been ongoing for the last 10 years, but has at last culminated in the publication of a description of a NEW Euastacus species for the western drainage of New South Wales, Australia.

The Cudgegong Giant Spiny Crayfish, Euastacus vesper

The Cudgegong Giant Spiny Crayfish, Euastacus vesper

The Cudgegong Giant Spiny Crayfish Euastacus vesper is described from the upper reaches of the Cudgegong River, east of Kandos NSW. The description was published in May 2017 in the international journal Zootaxa.

Euastacus vesper sp. nov., a new giant spiny crayfish (Crustacea, Decapoda, Parastacidae) from the Great Dividing Range, New South Wales, Australia
ROBERT B. MCCORMACK & SHANE T. AHYONG
DOI: https://doi.org/10.11646/zootaxa.4244.4.6

This new species seemingly has a very small distribution and faces a large range of serious threats. The next Project will to systematically survey the surrounding area and accurately define the exact distribution of the species and then publish a paper of its conservation status, something we consider based on the available information, would be “Critically Endangered”.

Research Project 100084 has been generated to designate a conservation status for this new Euastacus species.

Euastacus vesper (McCormack & Ahyong 2017)

Euastacus vesper (McCormack & Ahyong 2017)

For another article on E. vesper, see: 

http://www.austcray.com/2017/03/euastacus-vesper-new-euastacus-nsw/

Central Highlands Burrowing Cray Engaeus affinis (Smith & Schuster 1913)

Engaeus affinis from a communal burrow, Healesville, Vic

Engaeus affinis from a communal burrow, Healesville, Vic

This species is endemic to Victoria with a relatively small distribution known at this time (estimated extent of occurrence of approximately 200 km2). Found in the upper Yarra, Acheron, Yea and Big Rivers. An area roughly from Kinglake to Eildon to Jamieson to Noojee to Hoddles Creek. Central Highlands Burrowing Cray Engaeus affinis has been assessed on the IUCN Red List as Data Deficient. 

Engaeus affinis, Healesville, Vic

Engaeus affinis, Healesville, Vic

It’s a robust species and at many sites relatively abundant. Typically, it’s a communal burrower, both type 2 & 3 burrows with multiple surface entrances (20 or so) over a square metre. Both fans shaped entrances and chimneys. Surface openings descend into large central burrows. Central burrows are relatively large in diameter (150 to 200 mm), typically water filled and tending horizontal and descending and converging into a larger chamber.

Engaeus affinis, Badger Creek, Vic

Engaeus affinis, Badger Creek, Vic

Typically, the easiest way to capture is to excavate down to the water level, usually from 200 to 600 mm deep. Once water is found, wait, (patience required), larger males will come to investigate the disturbance and you can grab them, otherwise, every 5 minutes or so, shove your hand down the burrow and feel around in the water. If you are lucky and have good feeling in your fingers you should be able to grab one every 5-10 minutes. That’s the way we collected the specimens for this article.

Burrow entrance, Badger Creek, Vic

Burrow entrance, Badger Creek, Vic

Those from Healesville were in a yellow clay on the slope beside a creek approximately 1.2 metres above the creek water height (7 metres from creek bank) but had water at 650 mm in the burrow system. Those from Badger Creek were in a fine silty material in a seepage area in the tree fern forest with water only 100 mm below ground level and over 100 m from Badger Creek.

Engaeus affinis, Badger Creek, Vic

Engaeus affinis, Badger Creek, Vic

Happy Yabbying

Cheers

Rob

Lowland Burrowing Crayfish Engaeus quadrimanus

Also known as “The Mernda Land Yabby” Engaeus quadrimanus (Clark 1936) is a relatively widespread and locally abundant species. It’s a lowland species generally found under 250 m a.s.l. from just north of Melbourne, east along the Victorian coast to just before the NSW border. Engaeus quadrimanus has been assessed as Least Concern on the IUCN Red List.

Engaeus quadrimanus - note the burrow entrance behind

Engaeus quadrimanus – note the burrow entrance behind

This specimen is from the west of the range. Collected from the bank of Fish Creek a tributary of the Tarwin River crossing Meeniyan-Promontory Rd, Fish Creek, Victoria.

A very robust and adaptable species that usually has large colonies with the area being riddled with burrows. Typically, burrows are round to oval in shape and open with excavated material at the entrance (see photo). In some areas they can create a pelleted chimney but for many areas it’s just an open hole in the ground as the excavated material has been washed away with flood waters. Burrows are type 2 and relatively basic with only 2-3 surface entrances descending to a horizontal corridor then a deeper burrow to water table. Typically most of the burrow system is flooded and typically they are individual burrows with both males and females having their own burrows. One of the keys to the species is that they are intersexed so hard to determine which are males and which females. Breeding season is autumn and they can be found sharing burrows together then. The species is extremely active during flood events and uses the creeks to migrate and find mates, etc.

Fish Creek

Fish Creek

For a similar article on this species and images from populations further east, go to: http://www.austcray.com/2015/09/engaeus-quadrimanus-from-cann-river-victoria/

Cheers
Rob

 

A New Spiny Crayfish in Western Drainage, NSW.

Project: 100007 started back in 2008 final draws to a closure. The project that started out as an unidentified Euastacus crayfish species has been found in western drainage of NSW has been finalized with the completion of the project going to press.

The New Euastacus species for NSW showing an unusual colour variation

The New Euastacus species for NSW showing an unusual colour variation

A scientific manuscript title; Euastacus sp. nov., a new giant spiny crayfish (Crustacea, Decapoda, Parastacidae) from the Great Dividing Range, New South Wales, Australia, by Robert B. McCormack & Shane T. Ahyong has been completed and submitted to the journal Zootaxa.

The New Euastacus is a true spiny crayfish with numerous large sharp spines

The New Euastacus is a true spiny crayfish with numerous large sharp spines

The new species is described from the upper Cudgegong River, New South Wales, Australia This new species occurs in the western drainage of the Great Dividing Range, and is most closely related to E. spinifer (Heller, 1865), which occurs on the eastern side of the range. The new species differs from E. spinifer by its considerably smaller maximum size, greater degree of thoracic spination loosely arrayed in three instead of two rows, genetic sequence divergence in COI and unusual colour variations.

The new species is small in size with the majority of the female population breeding each year

The new species is small in size with the majority of the female population breeding each year

Both Euastacus armatus and the new Euastacus species occur in the upper Cudgegong River and this has led to much confusion in the past. Recent research by Whiterod et al., 2016 indicates that the E. armatus population in the upper Cudgegong is a translocated population.

In our present study, we formally describe this new Euastacus species, increasing the number of species of Euastacus to 53.

Cheers
Rob McCormack

Disused Aquaculture Ponds Wanted to Lease

Got an aquaculture facility that’s not operational or not making the amount of money you desire. Why not lease your farm or your ponds? We have clients in desperate need of ponds now.

Aquaculture is the fastest growing primary industry in Australia. Demand for aquacultured produce is skyrocketing and new production methods are increasingly improving profit margins making modern land based aquaculture an increasingly lucrative enterprise.

Unfortunately, difficulties in obtaining approvals for new ponds and the ensuing time delays in receiving approvals and then building ponds makes the interest level in existing ponds extremely high.

Existing yabby and fish ponds are wanted now so that large scale commercial farmers can expand their production by using your ponds. They come to you, use their staff, their equipment and technology, to get your ponds into commercial production. They don’t need you to do anything at all, you do not need to expend one cent towards the enterprise. They just rent your ponds or property nothing more.

If you have ponds not producing much or haven’t been in production for years then contact us for further details. Perhaps we have a lucrative solution to create a substantial, reliable income without any effort or expense from your end.

Contact

Rob McCormack

RBM Aquaculture

rob@rbmaqua.com.au

Page 1 of 512345