Australian Aquatic Biological

Australian aquatic biodiversity research and consultancy

Springbrook National Park, Gold Coast Hinterland, Queensland.

Late December 2012 we had an expedition along the McPherson Range and into Springbrook National Park in Queensland. This was the first of a series of surveys in south eastern Queensland and northern NSW. We are specifically surveying for Cherax and Euastacus crayfish but are recording all crustaceans captured. Paul and I surveyed all the popular tourist areas within Springbrook National Park as well as some of the more unusual areas.

Paul and I camped at The Settlement campground which was quite pleasant.

Paul and I camped at The Settlement campground which was quite pleasant.

The weather was less than perfect and finding our way through the forest was less than easy.

The weather was less than perfect and finding our way through the forest was less than easy.

 

Paul catching Euastacus sulcatus in Purling Brook.

Paul catching Euastacus sulcatus in Purling Brook.

Photo Euastacus sulcatus

The streams in Springbrook national park were full of Euastacus sulcatus. This E. sulcatus from the Tallebudgera Creek drainage had juveniles under her tail.

Photo the Lamington Crayfish Euastacus sulcatus

This male Euastacus sulcatus from the Little Nerang River was out at night and we spotlighted large numbers of Euastacus during our night time surveys.

Photo Sphagnum Frog (Philoria sphagnicola)

Frogs were common throughout the area, not sure what this is. Perhaps a Loveridge’s Mountain Frog (Philoria loveridgei) from Tallebudgera Drainage at 800m. If anyone can let me know what it is that would be great.

 

Frog photo

Larger frogs liker this were common at night in the Little Nerang Drainage at 750 m.

Photo Dragonfly

Dragonflies were also common around the streams and rainforest.

Photo Euastacus maidae

Paul with an adult Hinterland crayfish Euastacus maidae.

Our surveys of Springbrook National Park and the McPherson Range was extremely enlightening and we will revisit the area for more intensive surveys in the future. Our thanks to the Queensland National Parks and Wildlife Service for all their help and assistance with our preliminary surveys.

Research & Aquaculture Director for Australian Aquatic Biological P/L
Team Leader for The Australian Crayfish Project
Director of Mid West Yabby & Fish Traders and RBM Aquaculture
Secretary of NSW Aquaculture Assoc Inc
Research Associate for Carnegie Museum of Natural History
Honorary Research Fellow, Queensland Museum

You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

Tagged , , , , ,

2 Comments

  1. FelixFebruary 10, 2013 at 9:39 pmReply

    I’m by no means an expert but the first frog you pictured, the smaller one, could also be Loveridge’s Frog (Philoria Loveridgei).

    It does have the “squat” appearance that Philoria seem to have in all the database pictures.

    • adminFebruary 11, 2013 at 10:08 amReply

      Thanks Felix,
      You may well be right, Loveridges frogs are known from the area and this one was calling from a shallow burrow in a dry rainforest floor.
      Cheers
      Rob

Leave a reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*

nineteen − eighteen =