Australian Aquatic Biological

Australian aquatic biodiversity research and consultancy

The Giant Spiny Crayfish (Euastacus spinifer) from the Blue Mountains

The early morning view from one of the lookouts at Wentworth Falls

The early morning view from one of the lookouts at Wentworth Falls

A quick survey of some of the mountain streams in collaboration with Blue Mountains City Council proved most enlightening. The local streams draining through suburban areas seemed to have abundant numbers of freshwater crayfish and fish. We were very satisfied with the aquatic health of the streams we surveyed and following is a precis of the main species we encountered in abundance.

Photo Euastacus spinifer

Photo Euastacus spinifer

Euastacus spinifer is a Giant Spiny Group Crayfish was abundant in the Wentworth Falls area. They are a giant species that grow to a huge size of 1 kg or more and can have spectacular colours. The adults prefer the permanent clear flowing sections of streams and rivers and are active both day and night and can generally be seen wandering the creeks during the day, especially mid-afternoon onwards. In the clear mountain streams if you are quiet and patient you will see them wandering along the creek bed forever in search of tasty morsels.

The Giant Spiny Crayfish Euastacus spinifer

The Giant Spiny Crayfish Euastacus spinifer

Also in the same stream were large numbers of native fish. Both the Mountain Galaxias Galaxias olidus and the Australian Smelt Retropinna semoni were abundant in the streams with schools of 100 fish very common.

The Mountain Galaxias Galaxias olidus

The Mountain Galaxias Galaxias olidus

The Australian Smelt Retropinna semoni

The Australian Smelt Retropinna semoni

 

 

 

 

Research & Aquaculture Director for Australian Aquatic Biological P/L
Team Leader for The Australian Crayfish Project
Director of Mid West Yabby & Fish Traders and RBM Aquaculture
Secretary of NSW Aquaculture Assoc Inc
Research Associate for Carnegie Museum of Natural History
Honorary Research Fellow, Queensland Museum

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2 Comments

  1. GillianSeptember 12, 2013 at 2:09 pmReply

    Just wondering if these surveys have been done just recently, and in Jamison Creek in particular? I’m interested in whether the crayfish and fish stocks have recovered since the contamination incident last year?

    Thanks.

    • adminSeptember 12, 2013 at 2:23 pmReply

      Hi Gillian,
      yes the survey was done around 12 months after the spill incident. So the news is very good, Jamison Creek crayfish have recovered very well
      Cheers
      Rob

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